Rebel Attitudes

 

On Road Trips & the Risograph
written by Nina Prader

Luring you into the Fantasyland theme park, the title It’s Bad is a statement on a rollercoaster in Pristina, Kosovo, and a theme that repeats itself: What goes up, must come down.

 

It’s bad like empty badlands or the wild at heart spirit, the ingredients for a road-trip and therein, its documentation, a reportage. The anachronistic urban photography archives of Malte HM Spindler capture the moody beauty of solitude and the expansiveness of landscape found in public spaces.

 

Spanning travels from East to West in Europe, his lens documents and twists and turns from pop culture, historic landmarks to new perspectives. Is it a monument, a ruin, or a meme? These are postcards from an unknown time.

 

Though these photographic reports took place, they could be from anywhere, maybe not from this planet. Wild dogs lead you in on Mars-colored turf to the backdrop of black skies. Urban space is continuously inscribed with secret messages. Graffitis read as odes to anarchy in Berlin or redefine desolate places as glamorous Hollywood in Kosovo. A porcelain plate found at the Veddler Fischgaststätte in Hamburg can be read as a questionable love letter or analog meme.

 

Therefore, you will only find silhouettes, strangers and passers-by on these pages. In the polished surfaces of these images on the verge of cheesy, there is often a sardonic punchline.

Spindler brings references such as Robert Frank’s mom and pop shop views to mind, Bernd and Hilla Becher’s gridded German industrial buildings, and Andreas Gursky’s comments on consumer culture.

 

A black-and-white negative of a gilded shopping center in Milano, a copper factory glittering metallic hues near the Elbe, a spring cleaning granny on her for-sale, soon-to-be gentrified shop roof, juxtaposed to Helgoland’s bomb-crater turned tourist hot-spot. On one hand, they are romanticized economic depressions, on the other, there is worth in unexpected places. Spindler finds these invaluable moments. They amalgamate in the bright neon palette of Lucky Punch Press’s Risograph prints.

 

The exact and linear composition of Spindler’s snapshots is ruptured through the Risograph printer’s neon pink, giving each image a kind of unreal radioactive glow. Often photography’s matte or glossy surfaces are taken for granted, printing is a craft that is usually outsourced. Spindler is a publishing polymath, the photographer and printer; all in one. His darkroom is the Lucky Punch Press Risograph print room in Friedrichshain, Berlin. Instead of chemicals bringing his images into focus, the soy-based neon inks of the magical RISO smash out never before seen psychedelic colors to the photographic medium.

 

It takes multiple layers to create the saturated tones. The colors printed layer by layer create new color theories on paper. What looks like a silver print is metallic gold. The mundane such as the image of a rather large fungus, when held up to the light shimmers and becomes rarified.

 

Spindler’s images have a souvenir quality. They capture fleeting moments, areas that no longer exist, apocalyptic sunsets that have
set, flocks of birds and sheep on atomic pastures and skies. Somewhere between quietude just before the end of the world.

 

The images question themselves, a dead forest in Klotzow seems alive, they gently perform against the status quo. You would have had to have been there. Felt that sense of adventure that only a road tripper soul knows. That sense of freedom and novelty and dash of rebel attitude necessary to build a parallel universe.

It’s Bad

Risograph printed Road Trip Photography by Malte HM Spindler, with an introduction by Nina Prader.

Printed in 1C, 2C and 3C on 120g paper. 21 pictures on 38 pages. Laminated cover. Collated and put together by hand. Photos taken by Malte HM Spindler between 2009 and 2020, printed by Lucky Punch Press in 2020. The book and limited edition art prints are available via PM and in our Onlineshop.

Rebel Attitudes

 

On Road Trips & the Risograph
written by Nina Prader

Luring you into the Fantasyland theme park, the title It’s Bad is a statement on a rollercoaster in Pristina, Kosovo, and a theme that repeats itself: What goes up, must come down.

 

It’s bad like empty badlands or the wild at heart spirit, the ingredients for a road-trip and therein, its documentation, a reportage. The anachronistic urban photography archives of Malte HM Spindler capture the moody beauty of solitude and the expansiveness of landscape found in public spaces.

 

Spanning travels from East to West in Europe, his lens documents and twists and turns from pop culture, historic landmarks to new perspectives. Is it a monument, a ruin, or a meme? These are postcards from an unknown time.

 

Though these photographic reports took place, they could be from anywhere, maybe not from this planet. Wild dogs lead you in on Mars-colored turf to the backdrop of black skies. Urban space is continuously inscribed with secret messages. Graffitis read as odes to anarchy in Berlin or redefine desolate places as glamorous Hollywood in Kosovo. A porcelain plate found at the Veddler Fischgaststätte in Hamburg can be read as a questionable love letter or analog meme.

 

Therefore, you will only find silhouettes, strangers and passers-by on these pages. In the polished surfaces of these images on the verge of cheesy, there is often a sardonic punchline.

Spindler brings references such as Robert Frank’s mom and pop shop views to mind, Bernd and Hilla Becher’s gridded German industrial buildings, and Andreas Gursky’s comments on consumer culture.

 

A black-and-white negative of a gilded shopping center in Milano, a copper factory glittering metallic hues near the Elbe, a spring cleaning granny on her for-sale, soon-to-be gentrified shop roof, juxtaposed to Helgoland’s bomb-crater turned tourist hot-spot. On one hand, they are romanticized economic depressions, on the other, there is worth in unexpected places. Spindler finds these invaluable moments. They amalgamate in the bright neon palette of Lucky Punch Press’s Risograph prints.

 

The exact and linear composition of Spindler’s snapshots is ruptured through the Risograph printer’s neon pink, giving each image a kind of unreal radioactive glow. Often photography’s matte or glossy surfaces are taken for granted, printing is a craft that is usually outsourced. Spindler is a publishing polymath, the photographer and printer; all in one. His darkroom is the Lucky Punch Press Risograph print room in Friedrichshain, Berlin. Instead of chemicals bringing his images into focus, the soy-based neon inks of the magical RISO smash out never before seen psychedelic colors to the photographic medium.

 

It takes multiple layers to create the saturated tones. The colors printed layer by layer create new color theories on paper. What looks like a silver print is metallic gold. The mundane such as the image of a rather large fungus, when held up to the light shimmers and becomes rarified.

 

Spindler’s images have a souvenir quality. They capture fleeting moments, areas that no longer exist, apocalyptic sunsets that have
set, flocks of birds and sheep on atomic pastures and skies. Somewhere between quietude just before the end of the world.

 

The images question themselves, a dead forest in Klotzow seems alive, they gently perform against the status quo. You would have had to have been there. Felt that sense of adventure that only a road tripper soul knows. That sense of freedom and novelty and dash of rebel attitude necessary to build a parallel universe.

It’s Bad

Risograph printed Road Trip Photography by Malte HM Spindler, with an introduction by Nina Prader.

Printed in 1C, 2C and 3C on 120g paper. 21 pictures on 38 pages. Laminated cover. Collated and put together by hand. Photos taken by Malte HM Spindler between 2009 and 2020, printed by Lucky Punch Press in 2020. The book and limited edition art prints are available via PM and in our Onlineshop.